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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
the east coast this weekend. edward larns for cbs news, new york. >>> here in new york police are searching for a woman who pushed man to his death in front of a subway. she had been following the man and mumbling yesterday. it's the second time this month a man has been pushed to his death in the new york subways. >> coming up in the news, fun real fund scam. a woman is accused of posing ass a relative of one of the children murdered in the connecticut school shooting. this is the "cbs morning news." 6 "cbs morning news." stronger, holds up better, and still a value you love. new angel soft®. now stronger than ever. ♪ many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. now tell the world daniel... he is a good little monkey and always very curious. one day george got an important letter. he's built a rocket ship to travel into space." google, how far is earth to the moon? the moon is 238,900 miles... "the great moment had come." 3, 2, 1... [ giggling ] to the best vacation sp(all)
. nancy cordes, cbs news on capitol hill. >> jeff: the pressure on congress to reach a deal on the fiscal cliff is great. failure would be felt almost immediately in paychecks as taxes go up. and in financial markets as wall street reacts. even though the dow is up nearly 6% for the year if lost 2% this week as the deadline looms. for more on the potential impact of wall street i'm joined by jim awad chairman of plimsoll. let's talk about the fiscal uncertainity is figuring on wall street. >> it is figuring in an increasingly negative way. the markets are become increasingly concerned that business and consumers will pull back due to the uncertainty about tax and spending. and it's affecting the financial markets and the economy. >> jeff: a slow day tomorrow but how do you think we open? >> i think that if there is any rally it will be a fool's rallyment would you only get a rally if they announce something tonight. but the reality is that anything they announce would be light on fact and long on symbolic-- symbolism it wouldn't have a lot to do with entitlements. it wouldn't address the
, cate caugiran, cbs 5. >>> we now know it was an 11- year-old boy from daly city that is killed in a police pursuit in pasadena on christmas day. police and fbi agents were conducting a gang sweep when they started following a car that committed a traffic violation. the suspects took off and eventually hit a minivan carrying a family from daly city. an adult and 11-year-old were killed in the car. three others in the minivan were injured, as well. four suspects are arrested and face murder charges. >>> the search is on for suspects in a gang-related shooting in south san jose last night short live before 9 p.m. in the area off serenade and lullaby drives. officers safe the suspect started an altercation with the victim, shot him and then took off. the victim taken to the hospital, no word yet on his condition. >>> apparently the smell is what led to the discovery of a ghoulish plot. two people are under arrest now for what was found in the backyard of a home on warren avenue in vallejo. it was a badly decomposed body. richard romer of alameda died two years ago at the age of 56.
food, people. captioning funded by cbs >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for friday, december 28th, 2012. good morning. good to be with you. i'm duarte geraldino. this afternoon president obama will meet with congressional leader to try to come to a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. they've been called into a sunday evening session just in case some deal can be reached. boehner is expected to attend the white house meeting but he's made it very clear. the next move is up to the senate. tara mergener has more. >> good morning, duarte. both sides say they are eager to talk and ready to strike a deal. the fiscal cliff is still a few days away, but business owner don carlino says he's already feeling the impact. >> a lot of our customers are holding back, they're apprehensive. they're not committing to projects. they're waiting to see what happens with the fiscal cliff. >> hope is fact if congress can get it done before january 1st. even congressional leaders are skeptical. >> the american people have a right to be very upset with this congress. >> president obama has invited n
captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." >> good evening. jim axelrod is off tonight. i'm rebecca jarvis. with just two days left, senate leaders are still struggling to put together a last minute bp deal ahead of monday's midnight deadline for the fiscal cliff. failure could kick the country back into a recession. wyatt andrews is on capitol hill. >> reporter: today the halls of the senate were almost empty, as proposals got traded in private and over the phone. senate minority leader much mcconnell tried to sound upbeat. going to get a deal today sir? >> hope. so. >> reporter: house speaker boehner came to the capitol but left without comment. issue number one in the talks is amending the bush era tax cuts, which if unchanged will expire and raise taxes on all americans. starting tuesday, the average tax hike will be three to 5% per person. >> let's keep taxes exactly where they are on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. >> reporter: the president campaigned to increase taxes only on families making more than $250,000 per year. almost two weeks ago, th
and this time around, again, it looks like it's mainly going to be just rain. i'm david bernard for cbs news, miami. >>> at least six deaths are blamed on the storm system in the southeast. the trouble with tornados in hard-hit arkansas, nearly 200,000 people lost power, and the governor declared a statewide emergency. danielle nottingham reports. >> reporter: snow blanketed parts of the midwest and northeast. falling and blowing so hard it was difficult for road crews to keep up. as much as 2 feet of snow could fall in some areas. driving was treacherous. this car overturned in frederick, maryland. some trying to get home after christmas encountered dangerous near whiteout conditions. >> all of a sudden, we hit indiana, and we ran into this crazy snowstorm. >> reporter: well over a thousand flights have been canceled across the country and many others delayed including here at raggal international airport. >> i thought we were going to die. >> reporter:residents of mobile, alabama, heard what they thought sound like a freight train and a storm system touched down. >> we hopped into the cent
♪ captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." >> glor: good evening, everyone, i'm jeff glor. the company that calls itself the world's largest arms supplier says in three days it sold over three years worth of ar-15 ammunition magazines. the company brownell apologized on-line for delays in shipping the orders. the ar-15 is the nation's most popular semiautomatic rifle, similar to the weapon used in the newtown shootings. in washington, meanwhile, the gun control debate ramped up. on "face the nation" bob schieffer spoke with national rifle association president david keane, the first time the toup has spoken since making a statement on friday. >> scheiffer: when you came on television at this news conference friday you seemed to blame the mentally ill. you seemed to blame hollywood. you seemed to blame the media, the video game manufacturers. you did not seem to think that your policies have had anything at all to do with this. o> well, we don't think they eave. >> scheiffer: you see no responsibility. >> you know, we're living in a country, a free country which
to the "fiscal cliff" when doing your christmas shopping? many americans did because cbs 5 reporter mike sugerman tells us retail numbers weren't good. >> reporter: i'm at union square which is mobbed. it's swinging. i spent the day here and it didn't get active until a couple of hours ago and as i look around, i don't see a lot of people with bags. i'm not sure they're shopping. but the retailers really hope they will because because they are in a lot of hurt. susan wanted to buy toys for her grandchildren but couldn't manage to go to a toy store. visions of the sandy hook elementary school massacre were in her head. >> i couldn't take the shopping and seeing all the little kids 5-year-olds, 6-year-olds, particularly saddens me. >> reporter: she bought gift cards instead and none of the extra stuff she might have been found being in stores. december retail is a bummer in the news and stores. >> this is not at all a good holiday season for the retailer. >> reporter: it could have been for the customer. >> 495. our price is 179 and an additional 10% now. >> reporter: and no one is buying it? >> no
for tuesday and especially wednesday and thursday. reporting for cbs news, miami. >>> authorities in western new york still don't know what prompted an ex-con to gun down a group of firefighters. the gunman lured them to his neighborhood in the town of webster by setting a fire to a car and house. two firefighters were killed in the ambush. this morning, officials are looking for more victims. we have more from webster, new york. good morning. >> reporter: duarte, as investigators work to find out why two firefighters were killed, the whole town of webster is grieving this christmas. it's a day that should be about celebration. candles are burning for two firefighters killed in an ambush the day before christmas. >> our men are hurt, and they're not going to be home with their families now. >> reporter: police believe 62-year-old william spengler intentionally set fire to a house and car in order to lure first responders to his neighborhood. >> i'm sorry. i just -- >> reporter: that's okay. >> it's -- christmas. i mean, who targets people on -- >> reporter: authorities say spengler injured t
cordes on capitol hill. nancy. >> reporter: jeff, democratic aides tell cbs news that senate majority leader harry reid is ready to introduce legislation that would avert the fiscal cliff, but only if he gets assurances from republican leaders that they won't try to block it. that standoff is creating some tension on capitol hill that spilled on to the senate floor today. >> the senate will come to order. >> reporter: in the normally genteel senate, leader reid unleashed a tirade today about house speaker john boehner, accusing him of running a dictatorship in the house. >> speaker boehner is not willing to negotiate. we have not heard a word from leader mcconnell. nothing is happening. >> reporter: mitch mcconnell, the top republican in the senate, said it's reid who hasn't reached out for weeks. >> the phone never rang. and so now here we are, five days from the new year, and we might finally start talking. >> reporter: but talking about what? so far, reid has not introduced the scaled-down bill he was reportedly working on over the christmas holiday. sources say that bill would ext
only need one. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> glor: good evening, scott is off tonight. i'm jeff glor. it is the end of a holiday week, but it would appear congress is just getting started. tonight, the president said he is mottestly optimistic about a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, which would mean avoiding automatic tax increases and spending cuts come, you know, 1. the president spoke to the nation this evening after an hour-long meeting with congressional leaders at the white house. democrat and republican leaders have agreed to extend jobless benefits and some tax increases. they appear to remain deadlocked on who exactly will pay those higher taxs. we have two reports tonight, beginning with major garrett at the white house. major, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, jeff. two things are clear tonight that were not clear this morning-- progress is real and if a deal is reached, it will be far smaller than any of the key players envisioned only a couple weeks ago. is this deal, if it's to be reached, will not the so-called
. >>> the dreaded fiscal cliff can potentially affect a wide range of health programs. >> cbs news' wyatt andrews explains. >> reporter: professor mallen like hundreds of medical researchers has already fallen off the fiscal cliff. her budget which relies on federal grants is being cut by 10% now. as the nih, the national institutes of health, prepares for the possibility of budget cuts later. >> it's as much bigger than just my lab. it's affecting all-academic labs across the country. >> reporter: mallen understands the nih decision but calls it a setback. >> my lab will have to shut down research projects that we know would -- could have profound impacts on curing human disease. we may have to get rid of some staff members. >> reporter: the nih tells us because of uncertainty in the budget awards at 90% of what was perhapsed to researchers -- promised to researchers will be the standard at least for now and the threat of the cut raised alarms. >> some of the cuts -- >> reporter: at johns hopkins the doctor is under pressure to reduce the experiments he designed in mice in search for a cure for
sort of agreement, local leaders say they're preparing to lose billions in services is. cbs 5's political insider now phil matier shows us how it will happen. >> reporter: ed lee was one of the first officials to show up at the annual lefty o'doul's toy drive. but not a lot of christmas cheer out of washington this yore, not with the pending fiscal cliff and the threat of a $7.5 billion in nonentitled services is. >> that fiscal cliff will hurt the city to the tune of almost $80 million right away. >> reporter: most of the cuts would be in health care, aids programs and housing. >> that's just an immediate hit. >> reporter: across the bay alameda county supervisor predicted -- >> our health clinics will get hut. our w. i. c. program which is a program for mothers they get nutrition for their newborn babies and we have several sites in alameda county that would also experience a large cut. >> reporter: education would also take a hit. >> this would undo a lot of the good a lot of californians are willing to invest in the schools. perhaps as much as 10% for the special needs stude
three. how did abc news did on a parity with nbc and cbs? what's the timeframe that that happen? >> abc news, everyone always says it's the fourth out of three. for the '60s and '70s but it was a very weak news organization by all accounts. let's be clear. abc was the weakest of networks as well. if you recall there were two can be seen networks. nbc had to spin off one because they have trust concerns. leonard who took it over started building up the entertainment part at abc. is some degree of success for the 70s. he concluded away to really get parity with cbs and nbc was to build a great news organization. not so much because leonard love the news but the local stations been most of their money off of their newscast. he wanted to improve his affiliate line, really created modern olympics and said you go over the news come you spend as much money as you want which he did. and the buildup started in 1990 -- 1977 through the '80s. he did it in part by bring and what he'd done in sports. he brought in big stars. he already had barbara walters but he brought in david brinkley and diane s
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)